News from National Convention—Partnering with Educators and School Administrators

PTA Convention 2016 LogoOne critical component of running a successful PTA is working well with the teachers and administrators in your school building. A workshop at the 2016 National PTA Convention in Orlando focused on what those teachers and administrators want when working with their PTA. The panel discussion was moderated by Deb Strauss, National PTA Vice President of Membership (and an Illinois PTA Past President) and featured:

  • Dani Carver, an elementary teacher
  • Harold Dixon, Family Engagement Specialist for Charlotte Mecklenburg (NC) Schools
  • Sherry Griffith, currently Executive Director of the California PTA and a former school administrator
  • Renee Jackson, National PTA Senior Manager of Education Initiatives and a former principal

The panel began with Mr. Dixon sharing what he thought the three components of effective family engagement were for schools:

  1. Shared Responsibility (both schools and families committed to the process)
  2. Continuous Across a Child’s Life (cradle to career)
  3. Across All Contexts (e.g., home, pre-K, school, after-school programs, faith-based organizations, community organizations, etc. all engage with the family and school)

The rest of the workshop was devoted to discussion of questions from the moderator and audience. Here are the highlights.

What do administrators find to be the greatest strengths of working with PTA?

  • PTA’s family engagement programs (e.g., Schools of Excellence, Family Reading Experience, Connect for Respect, PTA Reflections)
  • PTA’s role in providing communication between families, teachers, and administrators and connecting families to what is happening in the classroom.
  • PTA brings to the school things that other parent organizations do not—a legacy of reliability, accountability, and stability—and the knowledge that if there is a problem in the PTA, there is a state and national association there to help.

What are the greatest challenges for administrators in working with PTA?

  • Both PTA leaders and school administrators need to have clear rules, roles, and goals.
  • Many school administrators simply see PTA as the ATM for the school, and it is necessary for PTA leaders to educate those administrators of the role of PTA in engaging and educating families and in advocating for every child.
  • Have a back-to-school meeting with the building principal well before school starts to share goals, calendars, and deadlines as well as to discuss how to collaborate to help the school meet its goals.

What are your tips for PTA leaders to work with school administrators?

  • Meet with administrators over the summer to begin collaborating and planning for the school year ahead.
  • Continue to meet with the school administrators during the school year to keep communication open and ensure that everything is running smoothly.
  • Don’t forget school district administrators as potential collaborators as well, since they can be some of the biggest PTA advocates in the district.
  • Invite the school board, superintendent, and other school district administrators to PTA events.
  • Find out what the school district’s goals are and discuss how the PTA can help meet them.

In terms of fundraising, how can PTAs work with school administrators?

  • Work with your principal over the summer to create a calendar that is not too crowded with school and PTA events.
  • Create a master fundraising calendar so that PTA fundraising doesn’t overlap with band booster, sports booster, and other fundraising at the school.
  • Don’t get too hung up on fundraising; focus on what your PTA can do to support your families to work with their children at home.

What advice do you have for working with principals who are under-involved or overinvolved?

  • Make sure that your principal understands that PTA is an independent 501(c)3 organization.
  • One of principals’ biggest fears is that PTA problems will become their problems. Be sure your principal knows that if there are PTA problems, he can also turn to the council, district, region, or state level of PTA for help.
  • If your principal is antagonistic or apathetic, approach the school district about how the PTA can help them meet their goals for the school.
  • Make sure that your principal knows that they don’t control the PTA. They have, at most, one vote on the PTA board.
  • If a principal or school administrator is retiring soon and “checking out” of engaging with the PTA, contact the person handling family engagement for the school district to discuss the future at the school and how PTA and the district can work together during the transition. Also, enlist teachers, especially teacher leaders, to help integrate PTA’s efforts with those of the school.

Our school district requires all Title I schools to have a PTA, but they seem to exist mainly on paper. What can we do?

  • Work with the families at the school to determine what they want or need to support their child’s education.
  • Focus on PTA programs that would help those families.
  • Every Title I school receives funding targeted for family engagement, and that money is returned to the federal government if it is not spent. Work with the school to have those funds used to support PTA programs and parent education, training, and leadership capacity building.
  • Have your school district stress why they require PTAs at those schools and the importance of those PTAs fulfilling their mission.

What are the first positive signs of good PTA family engagement?

  • Families need to see that someone cares about them and their student, that the PTA has goals and plans, and that the PTA is not just about fundraising. Once they see that, they will readily engage with the PTA and the school.

PTAs at the middle school and high school level are struggling to reach families. How can these PTAs better engage these families, since many of the PTA programs are geared primarily towards the elementary level?

  • How are you inviting parents to engage with PTA? Speak before school events (e.g., Open House, Homecoming, etc.) about the different role that PTA plays at the middle and high school level.
  • Parents have likely engaged with PTA around events at the elementary level, and are still event-driven towards engagement at the upper grades, but those events are now sports or other school activities. Since there is little classroom engagement at the middle and high school level (e.g., reading to students, parties, etc.) and students don’t want parents there in that role either, engage them on the curriculum and education side of PTA. Have parents serving on building committees or school district committees that then share that information with families.

National PTA Back-to-School Kit Now Available

BTSK-2016-1It’s that time of year again! The 2016-2017 National PTA Official Back-To-School Kit launched on Monday, June 27. As always, it’s jam-packed with tools, resources and info—all specially designed to help you run your PTA. It’s a one-stop click for everything you need to know.

For the second year, the kit is completely digital and mobile-friendly. This means you can view the website from your phone, tablet, or other mobile devices. Having the Back-To-School Kit with you while you’re on the go is a big perk. We guarantee it will help you be more efficient and productive as a PTA leader.

Here are the top three things you need to know about this year’s kit:

  1. This Back-to-School Kit is a Member Benefit
    Only PTA members can register and access the 2016-2017 Back-to-School Kit. Keeping helpful resources at your fingertips is one of the many ways National PTA supports you, our hardworking and deserving members. You have an important job to do and we believe this kit gives you the tools you need to be a standout leader.
  1. PTA Members Need to Register to Access the Website
    Registration is a very simple process:
  • Go to org. President Laura Bay’s welcome video and the homepage are open to everyone.
  • Once you begin to use the site, you’ll be prompted to register. There is also a “REGISTRATION” tab on the top right corner of the homepage.
  • Fill out all of the required information.
  • Once you’ve completed your registration, you’ll receive an e-mail with a link. Click the link to set a username and password.
  • After your username and password are set, you can access all areas of the Back-to-School Kit.
  1. All State and Local Leaders that Register for the 2016-2017 National PTA Official Back-to-School Kit Will Receive a Special Recruitment Tool

    Our brand new Recruitment Tool is a physical packet of information that will help you describe PTA’s goals, structure, and message. More importantly, it’ll help you recruit new members. At this time, only state and local leaders (region, council, district and local unit presidents) will receive the special recruitment tool. However, it can and should be shared with unit members.

  • When registering for the Back-to-School Kit, state and local unit presidents should provide the mailing address for where they’d like to receive this Recruitment Tool.
  • Mailing for the recruitment tools will take place from July to September 2016.
  • No additional packets can be requested at this time. However, we anticipate that many PTAs will request additional packets, and we are currently working on a plan that will accommodate those needs in the future.

Questions?

For a Back-to-School Kit FAQ, log onto PTA.org/BTSKit or contact us at BackToSchool@PTA.org. National PTA is also producing a how-to video that will walk members through the registration process.

How High-Poverty Schools Can Engage Families

SchoolOfExcellence_LogoAcademic achievement is often correlated with students’ socio-economic status—students from wealthier families tend to do better. But there is an increasing amount of research that shows that high-poverty schools can have students who achieve at the same level as their wealthier counterparts. The key is family engagement.

High-poverty schools have additional hurdles to overcome when engaging families. Many in poverty work several jobs, often with erratic hours. The household may have limited English language skills. Transportation for events during, after school, or in the evening may be an issue. The adults in the family may not have had a positive school experience when they were growing up and are therefore reluctant to engage with the school now.

A recent article at Edutopia, based on the book Turning High-Poverty Schools into High-Performing Schools by William H. Parrett and Kathleen M. Budge, illustrates how schools that actively engage families can improve student performance. The article highlights seven key strategies and practices for schools:

  1. Create Full-Service Schools and Safety Nets
  2. Create Links Between School and Home
  3. Offer Mentoring to Students
  4. Provide Opportunity for Community-Based and Service Learning
  5. Conduct Home Visits
  6. Ensure Effective Two-Way Communication
  7. Use the School as a Community Center

Some of these key strategies might sound familiar to PTA members. They parallel PTA’s National Standards for Family-School Partnerships. A great way for any school, high-poverty or not, to implement these standards is the National PTA School of Excellence Program. Enroll in the free program before October 1, 2016. Your PTA will receive an online survey to have your school community—families, administrators, and PTA leaders—to create a Family-School Partnership Scan. Submit the scan by November 1, 2016, and your PTA then receives a school-specific Roadmap to Excellence that contains customized recommendations that respond directly to your survey results. The Roadmap to Excellence provides the tools and resources your PTA will need to implement your action plan, telling you exactly what your PTA needs to do to become an National PTA School of Excellence. Implement your action plan, and then submit your completed application by June 1, 2017, then celebrate your success during the following back-to-school season! Sign up or read more today!

10 Great Ways to Get More PTA Volunteers

8975602227_090ce649a2_oPTA is the largest volunteer organization in the world focused on the welfare of children. From the person sitting at a registration table at open house on up to the National PTA president, almost all of the work done by PTA is done by volunteers. Here are XX ways your PTA can get more volunteers.

  1. Target new families to your school.
    New families want to know what is going on at school, so having your PTA reach out to those families can be an important first step towards getting them to volunteer. Consider creating a PTA Welcome Packet for new families.
  1. Toot your PTA’s horn.
    Families aren’t going to know what your PTA is doing if you are not showing them and telling them. Be sure to post invitations to upcoming events on your PTA’s website, Facebook page, Twitter feed, e-mail list, and in your newsletter. Follow up with pictures and thanks to your volunteers after the event through all of those media. Develop a communications plan for your PTA.
  1. Find the hidden talents in your school.
    The Cub Scout program is another volunteer-led organization that has used a Family Talent Survey to identify the interests and skills that families might be able to share as part of the program. Think about the skills, talents, and interests that parallel what your PTA does to create a family talent survey for your PTA. Use it to find the artist who might be interested in helping with your PTA Reflections program or the designer who might be willing to help create eye-catching flyers and posters.
  1. Ask for feedback after an event.
    Your PTA may have those involved in planning an event review how it went afterwards and consider how it might be improved. Don’t limit your feedback to just your organizers. Survey families at an event to find out what they liked, what they didn’t like, and what they would change as well. Be sure to include “I would like to help plan this event next year” and “I would like to volunteer at this event next year” options along with contact information at the bottom.
  1. Keep volunteer shifts short.
    Everybody at a PTA event wants to spend time enjoying it with their family. By keeping your volunteer shifts short, more people are likely to volunteer because they know they won’t be missing much time with their family. Take advantage of the Illinois PTA member benefit that provides your PTA with a free premium upgrade with Volunteer Spot.
  1. Use a procedure book to make volunteering less intimidating.
    A procedure book preserves your PTA’s knowledge about how to run an event or fulfill the duties of a board or officer position. It is also a great volunteer recruiting tool. A well-designed procedure book that includes detailed information on what has been done to plan an event in the past is like a guidebook to a foreign land, providing information on things you shouldn’t miss and potential stumbling blocks.
  1. Be sure to support your volunteers.
    Don’t just hand a volunteer a job description or a procedure book and send them on their way. Be sure to check in to see if they have any questions or issues. Show them that you value the time they are giving the PTA by giving them some of your time and attention.
  1. Talk to those that aren’t volunteering.
    There are many reasons why someone may not be volunteering for your PTA. Many of those reasons may be based on myths about volunteering for your PTA. By talking with those who aren’t volunteering, you can dispel some of those myths and get new volunteers.
  1. Add diversity to your PTA.
    Look at who your PTA leaders and members are. Do they represent the diversity of your school, not just by race, but also by age, gender, language, socioeconomic status, or other measures? If not, you have a pool of potential PTA members and volunteers that you are currently not reaching. Use National PTA’s Diversity and Inclusion Toolkit to reach out to those communities and broaden your PTA.
  1. Thank your volunteers often and publicly.
    Most people aren’t volunteering with the PTA just for personal recognition, but publicly thanking and recognizing your volunteers makes them feel valued and more likely to volunteer again.

 

Graphic © 2013 by Pump Aid Pictures under Creative Commons license.